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#...Brent Stirton - Pastoralists in Transition - 1 день осени

Oct. 26th, 2010

08:29 am - #...Brent Stirton - Pastoralists in Transition

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Brent Stirton - Pastoralists in Transition...





Image of a massacre site where the Pokot tribesman came out of the Rift Valley, their traditional area, and attacked a Samburu village over cattle grazing rights in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in the region for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009.



An emaciated Samburu Elder pastoralist stands in his burnt-out cattle boma at at time of the worst drought in Kenya for the last 100 years.



Images of a massacre site where Pokot tribesman came out of the Rift Valley, their traditional area, and attacked a Samburu village over cattle grazing rights in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in the region for the last 100 years.





A Kenya Police reservist guards Borana cattle which were raided by Rendille Moran tribesman in retaliation for a huge Boran raid in September 2009.



Melako Conservancy Scouts patrol Koya, an area which became a vast no mans land after extensive cattle raiding between the Rendille tribe and the Borana tribe, Koya, north Kenya, 28 February 2010.

The Rendille ended up moving 42 kilometers away and the Borana also pulled back, leaving a viable pastoral and conservation area deserted and contentious. The Melako Conservancy community group with the help of the Northern Rangelands trust are trying to rehabilitate the area for both Pastoralists and for wildlife tourism. The scouts are appointed by the community and with the help of a few Kenya Administrative Police are trying to secure the area and the wildlife so that people may safely return and invest in the area for both their cattle and tourism returns.



A Samburu pastoralist stands on the banks of the Ewaso Nyiro river, the only major river in the north of Kenya at a time of the worst drought in Kenya for the last 100 years, 20 November 2009. Due to the drought the Ewaso Nyiro is estimated to flow for only two months of the year and it is seen here right after the rains of a very brief rainy season. The drought has brought about increasingly deadly conflict between pastoralists as well as conservationists all competing for grazing land.



Aerial images of the ground effects on small farmers of the worst drought in 100 years currently affecting Kenya's nothern Rift Valley province.



Rendille women collect water from a well at the new Manyata Koya, a relocated village which moved 42 kilometers from the original Koya in 1992 due to heavy cattle raiding and fighting with the Borana tribe, North of Kenya, 27 February 2010.



Rendille Morans dig water for goats and camels in an area designated as sustainable by the Melako Conservancy comittee, Koya, North Kenya, 28 February 2010.





Pastoralist Masaai prepare a field of Maize in Orngayanet, Kenya, 22 February, 2010. Crop cultivation is a relatively new thing for the Masaai, and is a result of living next to other tribes who practise agricultural and have fared better than the Masaai with their cattle in times of drought and disease and shrinking grazing land. There are now large fields of maize under cultivation by the Masaai as some move from pastoralism towards a more stable means of income and subsistence.



Masaai elders sit outside a bar in a town which has grown up outside one of the gates of the Masaai Mara National Reserve, Orngayanet, 22 February, 2010, Kenya. This is a recent occurence, the elders would previously be found in the village dispensing wisdom and sitting under trees with their cattle in the distance. As their land has shrunk, populations mushroomed, droughts have impacted, the Masaai are increasingly in touch with the western world. A steady erosion of their culture is a result.



Masaai children at a boarding school for primary scholars, Olderekesi Ranch, Masaai Mara, Kenya, 19 February 2010. Education for their children, access to medical services and access to water are the three biggest pastoralist concerns today. The pastoralists across Kenya have found themselves at a tipping point, lack of land, overpopulation, pastoralist conflicts, the worst drought in over 100 years and huge subsequent cattle losses have driven the pastoralist tribes of Kenya to a point where change is becoming inevitable.



Images of a rural Masaai village school in Orngayanet area, Kenya, 22 February, 2010. The main priorities of the Pastorilists around Kenya is access to medical treatment, education for their children and access to water for good grazing. The culture around cattle however means that selling them for money for these purposes is often a reluctant process. As land for grazing diminishes and drough and climate change and overpopulation loom, these practises will have to change if pastoralists are to move into a modern way of life.







Beatrice Chebkurui, one of two nurses in a local Masaai village, treats a Masaai child who has Malaria and Pneumonia in her small clinic in Orngayanet, 22 February, 2010, Kenya. This is a private practise and an average treatment costs around 500 Kenyan shillings, around $7. The main priorities of the Pastorilists around Kenya is access to medical treatment, education for their children and access to water for good grazing. The culture around cattle however means that selling them for money for these purposes is often a reluctant process. As land for grazing diminishes and drough and climate change and overpopulation loom, these practises will have to change if pastoralists are to move into a modern way of life.



Olderekesi community group Masaai men walk across a hillside overlooking some of their tradional land, Olderrekesi Ranch.



Kenyan men who are former pastoralists now working for an early morning ballon ride service inside the Masaai Mara National Reserve.



Masaai men practise a tradtional dance they will perfom for tourists as part of a new income plan for members of this community who have chosen tourism as a primary income source as opposed to traditional pastoralist practise, Cottars Camp.



Mass building of tourist camps and lodges along the Talik and Mara rivers on the outskirts of the Mara Triangle Conservancy Masaai Mara National Reserve.



Scenes of local Samburu men from the Kalama Conservancy working at exclusive Saruni Lodge in Northern Kenya.





A tradional Masaai woman crosses in front of a Somali run Mosque in the Muslim town of Kajiado, Kenya, 25 February 2010. The rise of Islam is a new phenomenon in this region. Across Kenya the Somalis are increasingly a rising power. Their natural talent as traders has made them formidable businessmen and in towns like Kajiado and others, the Somalis and their brand of Islam is dominant and growing. Somalis have entered into business relations with the Kikuyu people and they have acquired large tracts of land from naÔve pastoralists
who now find themselves squeezed into unsustainable pockets of grazing land. As a consequence many pastoralists are forced into urban poverty or unskilled alternatives to cattle, all of which guarantee the increasing domination of the Somalis who already have political representation in Nairobi.





Lake Turkana in North Kenya



Dasenetch pastoralist people with their catch of Tilapia fish in Lake Turkana in North Kenya.



The Dassanech people in the Lower Omo Valley, South West Ethiopia, 14 December 2007.



Dasenetch pastoralist children play in a small pool in a dry river bed near Lake Turkana in North Kenya.



A Dasenetch pastoralist circumcision ceremony in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. The Dasenetch are moving slowly into a more modern way of thinking, with more focus on education and alternative livelihoods.





A Dasenetch pastoralist father and son use netting to catch Tilapia fish in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. Fishing is a relatively new phenomenon for the Dasenetch, drought and climate change have forced them to look further than cattle for alternative sources of sustenance and economy. Fishing has become the primary means in the Lake Turkana region. The lake is the largest desert lake in the world and sustains both Turkana and Dasenetch people as well as Gabra and other tribes in the region. Lake
Turkana faces an uncertain future however as the Gibe 3 dam project in Ethiopia, a massive hydro-electric scheme and Ethiopia's biggest single investment, comes on line.





Dasenetch pastoralist people with their catch of Tilapia fish in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010.



Trained Dasenetch pastoralist men sift for hominid fossils at one of the sites of the Ileret Turkana Basin Institute in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. The Lake Turkana region is one of the greatest fossil fields in the world and the Institute seeks to employ as many local pastoralist people as it can as a way of translating the value of the area across multiple platforms, from academia, to tourism and local job creation.



Trained Dasenetch pastoralist men sift for hominid fossils at one of the sites of the Ileret Turkana Basin Institute in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. The Lake Turkana region is one of the greatest fossil fields in the world and the Institute seeks to employ as many local pastoralist people as it can as a way of translating the value of the area across multiple platforms, from academia, to tourism and local job creation.



Trained Dasenetch pastoralist men clean fossils at the Ileret Turkana Basin Institute in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010.



Trained Dasenetch pastoralist men clean fossils at the Ileret Turkana Basin Institute in Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010.



Dasenetch pastoralist women bring a daughter with epilepsy to a local clinic in Ileret, North East Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. Access to medical care remains one of the highest priorities of the pastoralist people of this region. A lack of facilities and a lack of money by which to pay for medicine and treatment remain a big problem for these groups. The Dasenetch are moving slowly into a more modern way of thinking, with more focus on education and alternative livelihoods. The presence of various religous groups and the introduction of schools has had a profound impact on the way that Pastoralists view themselves and their future, changing values and distancing them from many of their traditional ways.



Dasenetch pastoralist men service a windmill designed to bring water to the town of Ileret, North East Lake Turkana in North Kenya, 20 May 2010. The Dasenetch are moving slowly into a more modern way of thinking, with more focus on education and alternative livelihoods. The presence of various religous groups, aid groups and schools has had a profound impact on the way that Pastoralists view themselves and their future, changing values and distancing them from many of their traditional ways.











Фотографии: Brent Stirton

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Comments:

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From:_esina
Date:October 26th, 2010 06:18 am (UTC)

фотограф Brent Stirton. Северная Кения

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гениально!
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From:alia_the_pony
Date:October 26th, 2010 01:36 pm (UTC)

Wow!

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Very nice! I had long wanted to see a photo about this country. Thanks.
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From:juliakomissarof
Date:October 26th, 2010 02:59 pm (UTC)
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не понимаю зачем надо так раскрашивать фотографии
но с настенной живописью очень понравилась картинка
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From:nana_teh1
Date:December 8th, 2010 06:02 am (UTC)
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Бедная бедность!
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